Friday, 19 February 2010

When cushions go wrong


It was with great excitement last week that I started working on this cushion as the honeycomb aspect of it is something that I've had in my head for a long time...ever since making this bag. I wanted to try something similar using a crisper, more easily creased fabric. I had actually meant to honeycomb the entire cushion but my selective memory had allowed me to forget how long this might take...I passed a happy four-and-a-half-hours slowly working on the section that you can see in the final cushion, listening to the radio and generally feeling happy to be doing some hand-sewing, until I decided that this was utterly self-indulgent and that I must create a cushion with only a honeycomb panel and leave it at that.


This is perhaps where things went wrong...I've also been wanting to make cushions in greys and creams, and so putting a little cream border around the edge seemed the logical thing to do. And then some more grey to finish off.


I felt quite pleased with it for a while...I'd found a new way of inserting a zip into the back of a cushion that completely concealed it and was easy to do (more and possibly a tutorial on that later...although you may - very sensibly - wish to refrain from taking instruction from anyone who could make something such as the above) and this was making me feel happy. It was only when Mr Teacakes arrived home and glanced at it sitting in the chair in the corner that I realised that I'd made something a little odd. I think that the gist of his thinking was that I'd created something that had a car-crash of styles within it...and that while the honeycomb pleating may be pleasing for the actual sewer to create (yes, that's me) that it wasn't necessarily what he'd choose to have in his own home. 'Fussy' and 'overly structural' were the two comments that have stayed with me and he found the cream edging panel particularly offensive...and all of this rang true when I looked at my cushion more objectively. It's so odd how sometimes you lose sight of what something actually looks like when you're working up close on it. This may all sound like Mr Teacakes was being horribly untactful, but he wasn't at all and I'm just as frank about his website designs.


All of this hasn't put me off using honeycomb pleating on bags, but it has made me feel that our house may be a honeycomb-free zone.

Having used all my lovely grey cotton up on this abomination above it needed replacing and so this little pile acted as the perfect comfort purchases. I had also run out of creams...it helped them go into the basket when they look so nice together. The black at the bottom is earmarked for a sleeveless top for me...I have a really clear picture in my head of how the top will look...now it's just trying to execute it!


I have added a 'follow me on twitter' button to the side of my blog...I have no idea why I have signed up to this, apart from that sometimes while sewing I have thoughts about sewing-related things that seem to have disappeared by the time I come to blog about things...and sometimes I see exciting things on my internet travels that I feel like I must share with others and then never do (there's a danger that my blog could become an entire list of links if I did). Mr Teacakes has strong opinions on cushions and Twitter. He has extracted promises from me that I will never write things such as 'about to eat lunch', or 'leaving the house now' and that I will only use Twitter in relation to sewing. As eating and leaving the house are often ignored in favour of stitching I won't find it too hard to keep within his guidelines.

My blog name has already been taken on Twitter, so we spent an amusing hour last night thinking up 15-character alternatives while Mr Teacakes was building Lego surprises for Dinosaur-boy to find in the morning and I was working my way through a series of bizarre floor exercises (necessary to make up for the cream egg(s) that passed my lips yesterday...every year I forget quite how good they are). I quite liked Flossie8teacakes, but in the end we decided on the more postal address-sounding 1FlossieTeacakes. Lovely Jenny quickly made the whole thing suddenly seem less faceless - thank you!

It has been half-term this week. We have had the most lovely time, mostly seeing friends, but also fitting in a Pyjama day doing arts and crafts. I'll show you what they made once I've had a chance to take a photograph of it...construction was rather involved and so I completely forgot to take any pictures.

Wishing you a lovely weekend.
Florence x

20 comments:

  1. I'm sorry you are disappointed with your cushion - I love it! I love the texture of the honeycomb, so clever!
    Chris x

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  2. I think the panal would work better for me if it were one comlete block across the front of the cushion rather than an inset. Beautiful work though! I always thought the FlossieTeacake I follow on twitter was you - just goes to show the power of a name!

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  3. Thank you, Chris!

    Kat, that's so funny...did I seem to have a rather split personality at times or does the other Flossie Teacakes sew too?

    Yes, you're right...the panel would have worked better either straight across...or perhaps just not at all.

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  4. It's so important that we get the ideas into reality and then decide if it's a winner or not. I'm sure from this exercise you will come up with some other gorgeous creation. Although I think it's lovely.

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  5. I feel I want to paraphrase - not the winning but the taking part - Not the finished article but the pleasure in making? The honeycomb of itself is beautiful, but perhaps not in the panel. Or is Mr T harking back subconsciously to those round honeycomb cushions in red velvet that everyone's granny had when I was a child. It's perfect in the grey though.

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  6. New cottons - how lovely. It is annoying when a project dfoesn't end up being of use to you, but at least you enjoyed making it Florence. Haven't a clue about Twitter, but I can see what you mean about those sudden thoughts. I always say them aloud to an empty room! x

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  7. I do love that cushion, but agree also with Kat about making the inset panel a simple strip. However isn't it funny when you spend hours making something, then stand back and think 'eeew'! We are out own worst critics, definitly. Speaking of which - Florence - you're doing fab on Twitter - it's great for those 'ohh, have you seen this…'moments. But it is addictive… Jen x

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  8. I love that adorable pillow! I go with the decorating style that it's perfectly fine to have a 'stuffy' item thrown in with a relaxed style of decorating. It keeps people guessing!

    By the way Florence, I absolutely love your blog and check it all of the time. You inspire me to try new things and not give up when something doesn't turn out quite right. I have the bad habit of getting frustrated and putting the project away. Thanks for your blog!

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  9. Funnily enough my first thought was that it should be a strip that runs all the way across, and also off center. Agree about the border too, but I am Mrs Monochrome...Still, it sounds like a heavenly way to pass a few hours.

    Wonder why bloglines doesn't update your feed for ages? hmm.

    x

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  10. You have to try though don't you? Your honeycomb is perfect, as is your machine sewing; it's just too bad the end result didn't gel with you. I think it's lovely...:)

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  11. I just had to write how lovely I think the honeycombing is, I like the finished cushion very much too so well done!

    Julia x

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  12. That honeycombing is lovely! The crispness of it with the beautiful, cool grey is wonderful. Maybe it could be salvaged and turned into the front for a clutch?

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  13. I think your cushion is quite nice! Though I do agree with Kat (above), it is cool and refreshing looking as is.

    I'm looking forward to your zipper tutorial!

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  14. I like the honeycomb! You did it very nicely. Maybe it would have looked even nicer if the whole of the cushion was honeycomb as you originally wanted. I tried cushions with borders etc once and although they were OK they were not as nice as I hoped - sometimes though you have to put ideas into practice; when they work as we want, fantastic but we also learn for the future what we don't like! Also men don't always appreciate things like pink or frills so mustn't always be taken too seriously! I agree with Amanda that it would make an excellent clutch bag too. It would be a shame not to use your lovely work in some way.
    Siobhan

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  15. hi there, really enjoy your blog since I discovered it via Sew Mama Sew. Hope u don't mind, I listed you as a 'Kreative Blogger' on my blog.

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  16. Wow, you have been busy. I love the honeycomb and really like the grey you used - very stylish!

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  17. I have to say, even though the final result didn't come out as nice as you'd want, I love that honeycomb effect! Just beautiful! How hard is that to do?

    I don't think it's a bad effect for a pillow, but I think it would look nicer without that border, and if the honeycombed piece was a stripe rather than a panel: that is, if it went all the way to the seams of the pillow.

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  18. Love the texture on the cushion. I have to agree about the cream border though. Have you seen Ruth Singer's book? Lots of lovely tricks for fabric manipulation to make different textures.

    Good to see you tweeting! x

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Thank you so much for taking the time to leave a message - it's always really lovely to hear from people.

I now tend to reply within the comments section, so please do check back if you've asked a question or wish to chat.

Florence x